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I'm Maya Dusenbery. I'm an Executive Director at Feministing. I'm also a freelance writer, editor, speaker, and Mother Jones-trained fact-checker.

Contact me at maya [at] feministing [dot] com and follow me on Twitter.
19 June 14
This, above all, is what Obvious Child does so well; by honestly and unapologetically showing one woman’s experience, it opens space for others. Ultimately, that ability to encourage—not stifle—the telling of more stories is the difference between a narrative that reinforces stigma and one that can help subvert it. Because as decades of stigmatizing Hollywood portrayals of abortion have demonstrated, a single story can be just as dangerous as silence. What is required to end abortion stigma is not just increased visibility but increased diversity—a range of stories so complicated and specific that they defy being slotted into easy boxes. To that end, we should think of greater representations of abortion in pop culture not as an end point in itself, Cockrill says, “but really a starting point for more conversation.”
— I wrote about how pop culture reinforces abortion stigma, how it can help end it, and why you should go see Obvious Child
Posted: 5:20 PM
kristine-claire:

Happy Father’s Day 😁

kristine-claire:

Happy Father’s Day 😁

Reblogged: kristine-claire

2 June 14

This vision depends on an assumption that violence is a discrete patch on our community, the outline already visible and perforated: if we just push gently, it will pop out of our lives like a paper doll from cardboard. That’s a comforting idea for those who lack power (change is possible!) and those who hold it (but not that much change is needed!). And because the narrower definition of violence is more palatable to men, it is also strategically useful. Nice girls with proper manners are allowed at the dinner table and on Upworthy if we don’t ask for anything too disruptive.

But this isn’t a contained infection. We can’t just cut it out. It’s a cancer, a pernicious proliferation of what we already are: the “not that bad” is cordoned off from “real violence” only for our own convenience. So we will have to disrupt the whole body, and though all men can help, most won’t want to.

— Alexandra on the “not that bad" violence that we refuse to name as such. 
22 May 14
Watch abortion access in the south disappear. 

Watch abortion access in the south disappear. 

3 March 14
desifeminista:

pizzafeminism:

"Women come from a whole range of backgrounds. If our visions of peace don’t include these differences, then our peace will be partial."~Kimberle Crenshaw

AMEN. 

desifeminista:

pizzafeminism:

"Women come from a whole range of backgrounds. If our visions of peace don’t include these differences, then our peace will be partial."~Kimberle Crenshaw

AMEN. 

Reblogged: desifeminista

10 February 14
This seems to the biggest confounding variable in Gottlieb’s theory. As far as I can tell, the common problem the busy professionals and uber-involved parents who populate her piece seem to have is they just don’t have enough time to do it–or at least not to do it well. Between jobs, child care, and housework, there are almost literally not enough hours in the day for sex, which is squeezed in “during a window between 10:30 and 11 p.m. when they [are] both tired but not yet asleep.” The piece is filled with stories of “two exhausted equals” trying in vain to “meet each other’s sexual needs.” And these are the privileged elite! If the upper-middle-class couples who populate Gottlieb’s small world are stretched so thin, the crunch is undoubtedly even worse for the minimum wage workers who need to juggle two jobs just to get dinner on the table. If those couples who are trying to balance the work most equitably still find there’s just too much, then maybe we should focus on transforming American work culture. I’m thinking a four-day work week, a universal basic income, and mandatory paid parental leave would be a boon to everyone’s sex lives.
— There’s no time for sex, and 4 other alternatives theories you could draw from Lori Gottlieb’s New York Times Magazine piece called “Does A More Equal Marriage Mean Less Sex?”
2 February 14

Reblogged: mocada-museum

13 December 13

mizoguchi:

Beyonce’s historically re-defining the meaning of Friday the 13th 

Reblogged: pussy-strut

Posted: 10:18 AM
Donate to Feministing on behalf of friend and send them an illustrated holiday card!

Donate to Feministing on behalf of friend and send them an illustrated holiday card!

20 November 13

It was my writing for Feministing—not my j-school background—that helped me land my first jobs in journalism. It gave me a way to show editors I could come up with interesting angles, that I followed certain topics closely, that I was a passionate writer, that I could do my research. My comments on my fellow contributors’ draft posts were the first editing I ever did. Feministing was my first glimmer of hope that I could marry my journalistic skills with my political beliefs and the sum would be greater than the parts.

The popular narrative of bloggers transitioning to full-time punditry involves a handful of young men in Washington, D.C. But this is my story, too: I used Feministing as a career springboard. It was the first public, online space where it seemed like my opinion mattered. Before, I’d been one of those young women who said, “Aw, I don’t really know that much about this” and “Who cares what I think about that?” Feministing proved that I did know, and people did care. Learning that was more important to my future career than anything I absorbed in j-school.

Unlike those other blogger-dudes’ sites, which were folded into mainstream websites as those men were hired and promoted, Feministing has stayed independent. This has had upsides and downsides. It’s remained fierce and outside the mainstream. It’s not associated with just one person or a small group of people—the site now boasts three co-executive editors, a dozen contributors, and dozens of emeritus writers and editors. But it also puts the “labor” in labor of love. Feministing has a bigger staff, readership, and workload that most venture-capital-funded media startups, with none of the financial backing. That has taken a serious toll.

— Read Ann Friedman on how Feministing helped her become the amazing journalist she is today. And then considering donating so we can make it even better.
Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh